Saturday, October 18, 2014

LET'S HAVE A TRAVEL BAN, LIKE THE 30 OTHER NATIONS DO!

LET'S HAVE A TRAVEL BAN, LIKE THE 30 OTHER NATIONS DO!

I DON'T KNOW WHY HAL ROGERS HAS NOT DEMANDED A TRAVEL BAN BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE AFFECTED WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES WITH EBOLA!  REPLACE HAL ROGERS WITH KENNETH STEPP AND I'LL PUSH FOR, AND VOTE FOR, A TEMPORARY TRAVEL BAN FROM THE WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES WITH EBOLA TO THE UNITED STATES.  IF THAT HAD BEEN DONE A MONTH OR SO AGO, THE TWO NURSES WOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN INFECTED WITH EBOLA!  STEPP FOR CONGRESS!

LET'S HAVE A TRAVEL BAN ON EBOLA, LIKE 30 OTHER NATIONS DO!


Dear Newsmax Reader:
It is outrageous that while almost every African country has imposed travel bans on West African nations with Ebola outbreaks, the U.S. still hasn’t done so.
Some 30 nations have already imposed such bans – See the List Here.
If the U.S. had enacted such a ban, we would never have had an Ebola outbreak in Texas.
If you agree with Newsmax’s editorial position that a temporary travel ban is sensible to contain Ebola, please take the following 3 steps right away:
  1. Take our poll and let Congress know your opinion – Vote Here.
  2. Call Congress and tell your senator and congressman you support a ban – call 202-224-3121.
  3. Forward this email to as many friends and family as you can today!

Thank you.
Newsmax.com

LET'S HAVE A TRAVEL BAN, LIKE THE 30 OTHER NATIONS DO!

Ebola Vaccine Would Likely Have Been Found By Now If Not For Budget Cuts


Ebola Vaccine Would Likely Have Been Found By Now If Not For Budget Cuts: NIH Director


Posted: Updated:




BETHESDA, Md. -- As the federal government frantically works to combat the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and as it responds to a second diagnosis of the disease at home, one of the country's top health officials says a vaccine likely would have already been discovered were it not for budget cuts.
Dr. Francis Collins, the head of the National Institutes of Health, said that a decade of stagnant spending has "slowed down" research on all items, including vaccinations for infectious diseases. As a result, he said, the international community has been left playing catch-up on a potentially avoidable humanitarian catastrophe.
"NIH has been working on Ebola vaccines since 2001. It's not like we suddenly woke up and thought, 'Oh my gosh, we should have something ready here,'" Collins told The Huffington Post on Friday. "Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would've gone through clinical trials and would have been ready."
It's not just the production of a vaccine that has been hampered by money shortfalls. Collins also said that some therapeutics to fight Ebola "were on a slower track than would've been ideal, or that would have happened if we had been on a stable research support trajectory."
"We would have been a year or two ahead of where we are, which would have made all the difference," he said.
Speaking from NIH's headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland, the typically upbeat Collins was somber when discussing efforts to control the Ebola epidemic. His days are now spent almost exclusively on the disease. But even after months of painstaking work, a breakthrough doesn't seem on the immediate horizon.
Money, or rather the lack of it, is a big part of the problem. NIH's purchasing power is down 23 percent from what it was a decade ago, and its budget has remained almost static. In fiscal year 2004, the agency's budget was $28.03 billion. In FY 2013, it was $29.31 billion -- barely a change, even before adjusting for inflation. The situation is even more pronounced at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a subdivision of NIH, where the budget has fallen from $4.30 billion in FY 2004 to $4.25 billion in FY 2013. (Story continues below.)
francis collins
The growing severity of the Ebola crisis in West Africa and the fear of an outbreak in America haven't loosened the purse strings. NIH has not received any additional money. Instead, Collins and others have had to "take dollars that would've gone to something else" -- such as a universal influenza vaccine -- "and redirect them to this."
Collins said he'd like Congress to pass emergency supplemental appropriations to help with the work. But, he added, "nobody seems enthusiastic about that."
Several Democratic lawmakers have in fact introduced legislation that would increase NIH funds to $46.2 billion in 2021. But there is no indication that such a bill will move forward any time soon.
Under the existing budget, NIH officials have rushed to find a breakthrough. Though health officials were already "cutting corners" in an effort to produce an Ebola vaccine, Collins said that a best-case scenario would be for a clinical trial to start in December, and it would take until February or March to know if the drug worked.
"If we wait that long to solve this, we will have basically failed with the more traditional measures of contact-tracing to get this epidemic under control," said Collins.
An Ebola vaccine, in short, would be an insurance policy, worth pursuing if other means fail and for possible future epidemics. Currently, NIH is working on a fifth-generation Ebola vaccine that has had positive results. But the tests are being done on monkeys, not people. To set up a clinical trial for humans takes time and resources, and doubly so in a country whose social and political fabric is as frayed as Liberia's. Even so, limited trials have already begun.
A second vaccine is being designed in Canada, just weeks behind NIH's schedule. But recipients have exhibited fever symptoms, which could prove problematic because elevated temperature is also a symptom of Ebola.
Collins says his "dream" is to set up a trial using those two vaccines and involving 30,000 people. But even with the current heightened demand, he cautioned that such a dream couldn't be rushed.
"Sometimes vaccines not only don't work, they make things worse," Collins told HuffPost. "Look at the HIV step trial, where that vaccine not only did not protect [against] HIV, it increased susceptibility because it did something to the immune system that made it more vulnerable. That could happen here too." (The private sector, it should be noted, hasn't developed an Ebola vaccine for a variety of reasons, primarily financial ones.)
Collins was more bullish about the prospects of developing a therapy, as opposed to a vaccine, because it would be possible to conduct a test trial among people already in treatment units, rather than among the uninfected.
So far, much of the focus has been on an experimental cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies known as ZMapp. But the current stockpile is not nearly great enough. Collins, a touch exasperated, said it would be all but impossible to have significant doses available by the end of the calendar year -- with a lack of funding once again playing a disruptive role.
"Had it not been for other shortages, we might very well by now know that it works and have a large stock of it," he said.
There are other potential therapies. Brincidofovir has been used on an Ebola patient brought to Nebraska and on the late Thomas Eric Duncan, who was diagnosed with the disease after traveling to Dallas from his native Liberia. Unlike ZMapp, there is a large stockpile of Brincidofovir available, and the doses required are small. "So you could imagine you have enough drug now to treat 16,000 people," said Collins. But, again, a clinical trial is needed in Liberia.
With more than 4,000 people having died from Ebola -- the majority of them in West Africa -- the clock is already ticking fast for the biomedical research community. On Sunday morning, it sped up even more as news broke that a second patient in the United States had tested positive for the disease. The patient, a nurse who had treated Duncan, is the first person to contract the disease on U.S. soil. Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they're looking into how it happened. Though the patient, who works at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, had been wearing protective gear during her encounters with Duncan, officials indicated that a procedural lapse likely caused the transmission.
Speaking two days before that second diagnosis, Collins urged calm when contemplating the possibility of an outbreak. Ebola is a disease that is highly lethal. But it is also only transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids or objects contaminated with the virus.
"Certainly there's been a lot of fear [in the] response from people who are probably at essentially zero risk, that this might somehow take over our country, which is really not going to happen," said Collins. "And despite all the assurances ... it still hasn't quite sunk in. There's still the cable news people who are whipping this up, and frankly sometimes using it for political purposes to sort of shoot at the government."
Collins didn't downplay the severity of the disease, noting that its rapid spread in Africa, and the humanitarian disaster it has left in its wake, should rattle people. He also agreed with the comparison made by Tom Frieden, head of the CDC, who recently said the current Ebola crisis is the worst epidemic since the outbreak of AIDS. But, Collins added, perspective was still needed.
"More people will die today of AIDS than have died so far in the entire Ebola epidemic," said Collins. "We've somehow gotten used to that, and it doesn't seem to be so threatening or frightening. Certainly in the United States, another 50,000 people will get infected with HIV this year, because that's been sort of the steady number."
"How many more people will get infected with Ebola this year in the U.S.?" he went on. "I would guess you could count among the fingers of two hands, depending on what contacts of the guy in Dallas actually turned out to get infected."

EBOLA VACCINE WOULD LIKELY HAVE BEEN FOUND BY NOW IF NOT FOR BUDGET CUTS!


Ebola Vaccine Would Likely Have Been Found By Now If Not For Budget Cuts: NIH Director


Posted: Updated:




BETHESDA, Md. -- As the federal government frantically works to combat the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and as it responds to a second diagnosis of the disease at home, one of the country's top health officials says a vaccine likely would have already been discovered were it not for budget cuts.
Dr. Francis Collins, the head of the National Institutes of Health, said that a decade of stagnant spending has "slowed down" research on all items, including vaccinations for infectious diseases. As a result, he said, the international community has been left playing catch-up on a potentially avoidable humanitarian catastrophe.
"NIH has been working on Ebola vaccines since 2001. It's not like we suddenly woke up and thought, 'Oh my gosh, we should have something ready here,'" Collins told The Huffington Post on Friday. "Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would've gone through clinical trials and would have been ready."
It's not just the production of a vaccine that has been hampered by money shortfalls. Collins also said that some therapeutics to fight Ebola "were on a slower track than would've been ideal, or that would have happened if we had been on a stable research support trajectory."
"We would have been a year or two ahead of where we are, which would have made all the difference," he said.
Speaking from NIH's headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland, the typically upbeat Collins was somber when discussing efforts to control the Ebola epidemic. His days are now spent almost exclusively on the disease. But even after months of painstaking work, a breakthrough doesn't seem on the immediate horizon.
Money, or rather the lack of it, is a big part of the problem. NIH's purchasing power is down 23 percent from what it was a decade ago, and its budget has remained almost static. In fiscal year 2004, the agency's budget was $28.03 billion. In FY 2013, it was $29.31 billion -- barely a change, even before adjusting for inflation. The situation is even more pronounced at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, a subdivision of NIH, where the budget has fallen from $4.30 billion in FY 2004 to $4.25 billion in FY 2013. (Story continues below.)
francis collins
The growing severity of the Ebola crisis in West Africa and the fear of an outbreak in America haven't loosened the purse strings. NIH has not received any additional money. Instead, Collins and others have had to "take dollars that would've gone to something else" -- such as a universal influenza vaccine -- "and redirect them to this."
Collins said he'd like Congress to pass emergency supplemental appropriations to help with the work. But, he added, "nobody seems enthusiastic about that."
Several Democratic lawmakers have in fact introduced legislation that would increase NIH funds to $46.2 billion in 2021. But there is no indication that such a bill will move forward any time soon.
Under the existing budget, NIH officials have rushed to find a breakthrough. Though health officials were already "cutting corners" in an effort to produce an Ebola vaccine, Collins said that a best-case scenario would be for a clinical trial to start in December, and it would take until February or March to know if the drug worked.
"If we wait that long to solve this, we will have basically failed with the more traditional measures of contact-tracing to get this epidemic under control," said Collins.
An Ebola vaccine, in short, would be an insurance policy, worth pursuing if other means fail and for possible future epidemics. Currently, NIH is working on a fifth-generation Ebola vaccine that has had positive results. But the tests are being done on monkeys, not people. To set up a clinical trial for humans takes time and resources, and doubly so in a country whose social and political fabric is as frayed as Liberia's. Even so, limited trials have already begun.
A second vaccine is being designed in Canada, just weeks behind NIH's schedule. But recipients have exhibited fever symptoms, which could prove problematic because elevated temperature is also a symptom of Ebola.
Collins says his "dream" is to set up a trial using those two vaccines and involving 30,000 people. But even with the current heightened demand, he cautioned that such a dream couldn't be rushed.
"Sometimes vaccines not only don't work, they make things worse," Collins told HuffPost. "Look at the HIV step trial, where that vaccine not only did not protect [against] HIV, it increased susceptibility because it did something to the immune system that made it more vulnerable. That could happen here too." (The private sector, it should be noted, hasn't developed an Ebola vaccine for a variety of reasons, primarily financial ones.)
Collins was more bullish about the prospects of developing a therapy, as opposed to a vaccine, because it would be possible to conduct a test trial among people already in treatment units, rather than among the uninfected.
So far, much of the focus has been on an experimental cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies known as ZMapp. But the current stockpile is not nearly great enough. Collins, a touch exasperated, said it would be all but impossible to have significant doses available by the end of the calendar year -- with a lack of funding once again playing a disruptive role.
"Had it not been for other shortages, we might very well by now know that it works and have a large stock of it," he said.
There are other potential therapies. Brincidofovir has been used on an Ebola patient brought to Nebraska and on the late Thomas Eric Duncan, who was diagnosed with the disease after traveling to Dallas from his native Liberia. Unlike ZMapp, there is a large stockpile of Brincidofovir available, and the doses required are small. "So you could imagine you have enough drug now to treat 16,000 people," said Collins. But, again, a clinical trial is needed in Liberia.
With more than 4,000 people having died from Ebola -- the majority of them in West Africa -- the clock is already ticking fast for the biomedical research community. On Sunday morning, it sped up even more as news broke that a second patient in the United States had tested positive for the disease. The patient, a nurse who had treated Duncan, is the first person to contract the disease on U.S. soil. Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they're looking into how it happened. Though the patient, who works at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, had been wearing protective gear during her encounters with Duncan, officials indicated that a procedural lapse likely caused the transmission.
Speaking two days before that second diagnosis, Collins urged calm when contemplating the possibility of an outbreak. Ebola is a disease that is highly lethal. But it is also only transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids or objects contaminated with the virus.
"Certainly there's been a lot of fear [in the] response from people who are probably at essentially zero risk, that this might somehow take over our country, which is really not going to happen," said Collins. "And despite all the assurances ... it still hasn't quite sunk in. There's still the cable news people who are whipping this up, and frankly sometimes using it for political purposes to sort of shoot at the government."
Collins didn't downplay the severity of the disease, noting that its rapid spread in Africa, and the humanitarian disaster it has left in its wake, should rattle people. He also agreed with the comparison made by Tom Frieden, head of the CDC, who recently said the current Ebola crisis is the worst epidemic since the outbreak of AIDS. But, Collins added, perspective was still needed.
"More people will die today of AIDS than have died so far in the entire Ebola epidemic," said Collins. "We've somehow gotten used to that, and it doesn't seem to be so threatening or frightening. Certainly in the United States, another 50,000 people will get infected with HIV this year, because that's been sort of the steady number."
"How many more people will get infected with Ebola this year in the U.S.?" he went on. "I would guess you could count among the fingers of two hands, depending on what contacts of the guy in Dallas actually turned out to get infected."

Hal Rogers Defends CDC Director Frieden!


Hal Rogers talks Ebola, defends Frieden

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Posted: Thursday, October 16, 2014 11:41 pm
ASHLAND The embattled director of the Centers for Disease Control has at least one Kentucky advocate — Fifth District U.S. Congressman Hal Rogers. “I’m afraid he’s getting some undue blame” for the CDC’s handling of Ebola cases in the United States, Rogers said Thursday at King’s Daughters Medical Center. “I have full confidence in Dr. (Tom) Frieden,” he said.
Rogers spoke to a cross-section of King’s Daughters employees during a lunchtime appearance at the hospital, where he touched on the growing concern about the potentially deadly disease and about the Shaping Our Appalachian Region initiative to reinvigorate eastern Kentucky’s economy. Rogers said he met with Frieden just as Ebola was emerging as a domestic issue and that they had talked about eastern Kentucky’s own top health issues — heart disease, diabetes, obesity and lung cancer mortality, for all of which rates are dramatically higher than the national average. Frieden promised help, including senior CDC staffers, Rogers said. Congress, where Rogers is appropriations chairman, has authorized some $800 million to fight the spread of the disease. Most of the money will fund a military mission to send troops to Africa, where they will assist health workers in setting up field hospitals. The money is conditioned on providing timetables and spending plans and protecting U.S. troops from the disease. Only a handful of Ebola cases have been reported in the United States, but hospitals, including KDMC, are planning and taking precautions. KDMC has posted signs in its emergency room and primary care centers alerting patients to symptoms and routes of exposure, and is screening patients for symptoms, said KDMC CEO Kristie Whitlatch, who accompanied Rogers.

Monday, October 13, 2014

QUADRUPLE U.S. FUNDS TO FIGHT EBOLA!

LET'S LOOK AT THE RECORD. FOUR THOUSAND PEOPLE IN AFRICA ARE DEAD FROM THE LATEST EBOLA EPIDEMIC, AND A NURSE IN TEXAS IS THE FIRST PERSON TO CATCH EBOLA WHILE IN THE UNITED STATES.
      KENNETH STEPP SAYS LET'S QUADRUPLE FUNDS TO FIGHT EBOLA!  WE CAN BEAT THIS EPIDEMIC, BUT IGNORING IT WON'T HELP.  TIME IS SHORT.  IT'S TIME TO DEFEND OURSELVES AGAINST THE EBOLA EPIDEMIC.  KENNETH STEPP!

Friday, October 10, 2014

STEPP ENDORSED BY THE TEAMSTERS!

October 10, 2014

TEAMSTERS ENDORSE STEPP FOR

U.S. HOUSE, KENTUCKY FIFTH DISTRICT.

In an August 4, 2014 Letter from TEAMSTERS LOCAL UNION 651 , AFFILIATED WITH THE INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS, President Mike Philbeck of the Local Teamsters Union praised Democratic Congressional Candidate Stepp, explaining:

“Each year, Teamsters Local 651 focuses on endorsing the right candidates for political election. Our decision to support a candidate is not taken lightly, and an endorsement comes only after that candidate has established a record of proven support for labor and the working families of Kentucky.

“On behalf of the Teamsters Local 651 Executive Board, I am pleased to inform you that you have earned the full endorsement of our membership. We appreciate your desire to support the labor movement and the unions that fight so hard to protect the livelihoods of Kentucky’s working men and women. We are always proud to support those who support us and we look forward to a strong relationship in the coming year.

“The people of Kentucky are in desperate need of elected officials that will protect the interests of the middle class. We are confident that you will continue to support our community of hard-working families and find success in your campaign.

“Teamsters stay united and you can count on us as we know we can count on you!”
KENNETH STEPP AT THE TEAMSTERS PICNIC IN LEXINGTON KENTUCKY ON LABOR DAY!  STEPP FOR CONGRESS!

Ebola toll passes 4,000 as fears grow worldwide

"Ebola toll passes 4,000 as fears grow worldwide
AFP

    A team of funeral agents specialised in the burial of  victims of the Ebola virus carry a body prior to putting it in a grave at the Fing Tom cemetery in Freetown, on October 10, 2014
    .
    View gallery
    • .
    • .
    Madrid (AFP) - The death toll from Ebola has passed 4,000, the World Health Organization said Friday, while a Madrid nurse was fighting for her life and authorities worldwide tried to prevent panic over the deadly disease.
    The WHO said 4,033 people have died from Ebola as of October 8 out of a total of 8,399 registered cases in seven countries. The sharp rise in deaths came as the UN said aid pledges to fight the outbreak have fallen well short of the $1 billion (800 million euros) needed.
    Beyond west Africa, where almost all the deaths have occurred, fears grew about the worst-ever Ebola epidemic.
    From Australia to Zimbabwe, and Macedonia to Spain, people who showed signs of fever or had recent contact with Ebola victims were whisked into isolation units or ordered to stay in their homes.
    Authorities warned that hoaxes could trigger panic as a man was taken off a US flight by a bio-hazard team after he sneezed and reportedly said, "I have Ebola. You are all screwed."
    Serious concerns remained in Spain over how the virus could have spread in the country's main isolation hospital.
    Healthcare workers told AFP the quarantine floor of Carlos III hospital in Madrid, where 44-year-old nurse Teresa Romero was infected, was shut last year as a result of spending cuts and only re-opened for two missionaries flown back from Africa with the disease in August.
    Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy visited the hospital, where Romero, who caught the haemorrhagic fever while caring for the missionaries, was said to be in a "stable but serious" condition on Friday.
    Doctors there took in seven more patients for observation late Thursday. Romero's husband and 12 other people, most of them medical staff, were also under observation, though a male nurse had been discharged, the hospital said.

    - Ebola staff 'stressed' -

    In a sign of the stress at the hospital, staff did not show up for work on Friday.
    "There are fewer staff signing up to help," said one nurse caring for Romero, Charly Manuel Torres, referring to voluntary extra cover at the hospital.
    "We are very stressed. We are working under a lot of pressure."
    The United Nations and leaders of the Ebola-stricken nations of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone pleaded for greater help for the frontline of the disease in Africa.
    UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson said only a quarter of "the one billion dollars sought" to combat the disease had been pledged. He appealed for doctors, nurses and other healthcare personnel to come forward.
    His comments echoed a plea on Thursday from UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon who said resources to support the fight must be increased 20-fold.
    "Cases are growing exponentially," Ban said. "Do not wait for consultation. Just take action."
    "We have to work now so that it is not the world's next AIDS," CDC Director Tom Frieden warned at the meeting.
    "I would say that in the 30 years I've been working in public health, the only thing like this has been AIDS," he said, adding that there was a "long fight" ahead.
    But in Liberia, where the official death toll was put at 2,316 by the WHO on Friday, the government said it had banned journalists from Ebola clinics, arguing it was to protect patients' privacy.
    The move came as nurses at the largest government Ebola clinic in the capital Monrovia staged a "go slow" to demand hazard pay, defying a request by UN health officials to avoid industrial action during the crisis.

    - Alerts abound -

    In France a public building was briefly evacuated in a Paris suburb on Thursday when an African man felt ill. Earlier, the arrival of a group of schoolchildren from Guinea had sparked panic at a French school. Ebola was ruled out in both cases.
    Macedonia quarantined people who had come into contact with a Briton who died on Thursday after exhibiting Ebola-like symptoms.
    The US, Canada and Britain boosted screening at major airports.
    The Moroccan government called for the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations to be postponed due to the epidemic.
    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted the number of cases could mount to 1.4 million by January unless strong measures are taken to contain the disease.
    View Comments (8)" 
    As your Congressman, Kenneth Stepp would vote to quadruple medical aid to combat Ebola to Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea.  It is not merely a West African problem, it is our problem, too.  No man is an island, no man stands alone.  We should fight the Ebola virus here at home, but we should also fight it where it is now, in West Africa.  Fight the enemy on their own ground.  Today Ebola is the enemy and it will be coming after us, if we don't go after it.  The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted the number of cases could mount to 1.4 million by January unless strong measures are taken to contain the disease.  A world with 1.4 million cases of Ebola would be a grim place to live.  A close relative of mine, and a lawyer I know both were heard to opine that Ebola will do us all in.  I hope not, but let's throw money and technology at the problem while we still can.  We survived the MAD-strategy nuclear arms race of the cold war, we survived the AIDs epidemic, and I expect we will survive the Ebola epidemic, also.  The Bible teaches that there are "the quick and the dead".   Let's be among the quick.  Let's be quick to ship medical supplies and aid to West Africa to stop the Ebola epidemic in its tracks.  Let's sent humanitarian aid and medical aid to the people in
    West Africa in the path of the Ebola epidemic.  Quickness counts.  He who hesitates is lost.  STEPP FOR CONGRESS!

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014

    Kenneth Stepp talking with Rocky Adkins, Democratic Majority Floor Leader, Kentucky House of Representatives

    Wilma Stepp's photo.


    AT HIS RECENT INTRODUCTORY SPEECH FOR ALISON LUNDERGAN GRIMES, ROCK ADKINS KEPT SAYING, "WHEN DEMOCRATS VOTE, DEMOCRATS WIN!"  BE SURE TO VOTE FOR THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES AND VOTE FOR STEPP FOR CONGRESS!  I'LL SEE YOU AT THE POLLS NOVEMBER 4!
    Wilma Stepp's photo.

    Kenneth Stepp speaking a Boyd County Democratic Picnic

    Wilma Stepp's photo.

    Saturday, September 20, 2014

    The Racist Origin of America's Gun Control Laws

    * * *
    America’s First Racist Gun Control Laws
    The very first gun control laws in America were slave codes that banned African-Americans from owning or bearing arms. As early as 1640, the Virginia legislature passed an ordinance stating that African-American slaves — then numbering fewer than 300 in the British colony — would be exempt from mandatory militia service. The Virginia slave code of 1680 made disarmament of all black people mandatory, ruling, “It shall not be lawfull for any negroe or other slave to carry or arme himselfe with any club, staffe, gunn, sword or any other weapon of defence or offence,” a prohibition repeated in the 1705 Virginia slave code, written in more modern language, requiring that “no slave go armed with gun, sword, club, staff, or other weapon.”
    The prohibition against slaves owning or carrying guns or other weapons in Britain’s American colonies preceded other gun control laws across the British empire, including the penal laws against the Irish, which in 1695 required that “All papists [Catholics] within this kingdom of Ireland shall before the 1st day of March, 1696, deliver up to some justice of the peace or corporation officer where such papist shall dwell, all their arms and ammunition, notwithstanding any licence for keeping the same heretofore granted.”
    The rules against owning guns were aimed not just at those nominally deemed “slaves” in America; they were aimed at all subjected peoples. The text of Virginia’s first slave code applied the same restriction to “free” blacks and indentured servants (mostly Irish Catholics and Scotch Presbyterians, but also criminals). Nearly all other Southern slave-holding states copied Virginia’s lead, passing laws banning the ownership of guns for both slave and free African-Americans. These laws stayed in effect and were updated after independence from Britain. Georgia’s 1833 slave code required that “the free persons of color, so detected in owning, using or carrying fire-arms, shall receive on his bare back, thirty-nine lashes.” Alabama’s 1833 slave code was nearly identical, with exactly the same punishment. North Carolina’s 1855 slave code simply stated: “No slave shall go armed with gun, sword, club or other weapon, or shall keep any such weapon.” The state omitted the mention of free blacks, largely because North Carolina had so few free African-Americans.
    * * *
    "In the history of gun control elsewhere across the globe, there have been many examples of genocide where the victim race or ethnic group has been disarmed before the genocide took place. One particularly valuable scholarly analysis of this trend was the 1994 bookLethal Laws by Jay Simkin, Alan Rice, and Aaron Zelman, which analyzed the gun control laws of six national genocides. In each of the six cases, from the Turkish slaughter of the Armenians to the Nazi annihilation of the Jews to the Rwandan Hutus killing the Tutsis, strict gun control laws were in place for the victim populations before the genocide. America avoided genocide, but historically its gun control laws served a similar racist purpose by subjugating African-Americans legally and leaving them to the ravages of terrorist organizations such as the Red Shirts and the Ku Klux Klan."
    Hitler and Stalin were masters at gun control.  "Trust me, I'm from the government," the Man says.  According to a novel read to me, Nicolai Lenin once commented, "One man with a gun can control a hundred men without guns."  Communism is minority government.  If you want government run by an oligarchic minority, then vote for gun control.  Kenneth Stepp opposes gun control, whether it be laws against the German Jews, the Armenian Christians, the American Southerners (black or white) , or the Tutsis.  The Establishment would reduce your gun-owners' rights, but not Kenneth Stepp.  Kenneth Stepp favors gun owners' rights and Second Amendment rights.  STEPP FOR CONGRESS!

    AUDIT THE FED!

    "Saturday, 20 September 2014 08:00

    "Auditing the Federal Reserve

    Written by        

    module by Spiral

     


    On September 17, 2014, the House of Representatives voted 333 to 92 in favor a measure calling for an audit of the Federal Reserve. Introduced by Representative Paul Broun (R-Ga.), H.R. 24 won the support of 227 Republicans and 106 Democrats — which is well beyond the two-thirds needed for passage. Californian John Campbell was the lone Republican House member who sided with 91 Democrat opponents of the bill. The Senate must now give its two-thirds approval of the companion measure, S. 209, introduced in that body by Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.).
    H.R. 24 calls for “a full audit of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the federal reserve banks by the Comptroller General of the United States.” There never has been any such audit in the Fed’s 101 years of existence. The companion Senate measure seeks identical openness. Both measures carry the title, “Federal Reserve Transparency Act,” the word “transparency” being what’s long been needed. And each of the bills requires that the audit be conducted within a year of final passage.
    In his discussion about the need for this audit, Senator Paul noted that no “meaningful” audit of the Fed has ever been conducted. Less than honest and transparent scrutiny has been practiced under stifling restrictions, but Senator Paul and his colleagues want openness, not more cover-ups. To indicate how little is known about the Fed’s activities, he stated: “... when the primary auditor and overseer of the Fed was asked about $9 trillion dollars, the Inspector General had no clue what had been purchased.” After noting that the $9 trillion figure is more than half of the nation’s admitted indebtedness, he concluded, “The Federal Reserve is one of the most secretive institutions in our history.”



    The Senate measure already has 30 co-sponsors, all Republicans but for Alaska’s Democrat Senator Mark Begich. Gaining 37 more Yes votes for the measure in the Senate (the number needed to reach the two-thirds plateau) will not be easy with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D.-Nev.) strongly opposed to the idea.
    A thorough audit of the Fed will likely lead to consideration of a subsequent measure calling for terminating the institution. Our nation needs sound money, not fiat currency generated by the secretive Fed that should never have been given the power it possesses. As more Americans realize that the once “almighty” dollar has shrunk in value from a worth of 100 cents in 1913 to a mere 2 cents today because of Fed action, pressure for abolishing it and returning to precious-metal-backed currency continues to grow. All who want openness at the Fed and sound money should be contacting both of the their senators to request support for S. 209."


    John F. McManus is . . . publisher of The New American."

    Kenneth Stepp agrees with Ron Paul and Rand Paul, it's time to Audit the Fed.  We citizens are the Masters.  The Fed is our servant.  Since when did a servant seek his activities secret from his master.  Since when did an agent keep his activities secret from his principal.  It's time for more transparency in government.  AUDIT THE FED!